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The English do not have worse teeth than Americans, study proves

Posted on January 12, 2016 at 2:20 PM

It is a common stereotype, propagated by characters such as Austin Powers: the British man with an abysmal set of chompers. But a new study comparing oral health in the US and England reveals that the oral health of Americans is no better than that of the English.

According to the authors of the study, published in The BMJ's Christmas issue, the popular belief held by Americans that the English have terrible teeth dates back over a century, with toothpaste ads eulogizing American smiles.

But until now, there were no studies that directly compared oral health levels and inequalities between England and America.


As such, researchers from both the UK and the US used data from the English Adult Dental Health Survey (ADHS) and the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to compare oral health and assess educational levels and income-related oral health inequalities.

 The study authors note that the UK and US both share similar political systems, but the funding and delivery of health care is quite different.

 In the UK, for example, dental care is mostly provided through the National Health Service (NHS), whereas in the US, dental insurance coverage is how care is delivered.

 Study participants included adults aged 25 years and older. For analysis by education, there were samples of 8,719 English adults and 9,786 American adults. For analysis by income, the sample included 7,184 English participants and 9,094 American adults.

 The researchers looked at outcomes including number of missing teeth, subject self-perception of oral health and oral impacts on daily life - including pain, difficulty eating, avoiding smiling and social effects.

 Results showed that the average number of missing teeth was higher in the US than in England, at 7.31 vs. 6.97, respectively. However, reporting of oral impacts on daily life was higher in England.

 The study also showed evidence of oral health socioeconomic inequalities in both countries, but they were higher in the US than in England for all measures.

 In the US, social inequalities are higher; Americans have different levels of access and treatment services than their British counterparts, and the authors say this fact may have contributed to their findings.

 They add that "wider societal differences in welfare policies exist, with England having a more comprehensive range of 'safety net' policies, which may help to reduce oral health inequalities."

 In detail, adults in the lowest socioeconomic position had better oral health in England. Meanwhile, those at the top educational or income levels had better oral health in the US.

 Citing sugar consumption and smoking as other possible reasons for their findings, the researchers emphasize differences in welfare policies as the main contributing factor:

 
"In conclusion, we have shown that the oral health of Americans is not better than the English, and there are consistently wider educational and income-related oral health inequalities in the US compared with England."

 Despite the strength of their large sample size, the study authors point to some limitations. For example, they note that the comparability of subjective measures of oral health serve as a limitation, "as these are sensitive to cultural differences in reporting."

 Additionally, they note their analysis was limited to just one measure of oral health status - number of missing teeth - so it did not include any aesthetic or orthodontic outcomes, which could be a potential area for future study.

 Medical News Today recently reported that some sugar-free drinks can also damage teeth. Authors from that study warned that a sugar-free label does not make a product tooth-friendly.

 Written by Marie Ellis

 http [:/] /www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/304224.php

Dental check-ups are important!

Posted on September 18, 2015 at 4:35 PM


Tooth Decay

Posted on July 16, 2015 at 6:05 PM


The Tooth Friendly Diet

Posted on June 3, 2015 at 4:30 PM

Try these foods to help build strong teeth and healthy gums

What you eat affects your mouth not only by building healthier teeth and gums, but also by helping prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Learn how to eat the best diet for your teeth, including the foods to eat, beverages to drink, and what to avoid.

What you eat affects your mouth not only by building healthier teeth and gums, but also by helping prevent tooth decay and gum disease. While a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and unsaturated fats will benefit your overall oral health, there are a few standout foods and nutrients that can really boost it.

Teeth and Calcium

Mom said it when you were in grade school, and she was right on this one: Drinking milk builds strong bones and teeth. Calcium is vital in childhood and through your teens, when teeth are formed, but the value of this nutrient doesn't stop once you get your wisdom teeth. A diet with adequate calcium may prevent against tooth decay, says Dr. Leonard Anglis, DDS. When a diet is low in calcium, as a majority of Americans' diets are, the body leeches the mineral from teeth and bones, which can increase your risk of tooth decay and the incidence of cavities. A study that appeared in the Journal of Periodontology found that those who have a calcium intake of less than 500 mg, or about half the recommended dietary allowance, were almost twice as likely to have periodontitis, or gum disease, than those who had the recommended intake.

The jawbone is particularly susceptible to the effects of low calcium. It can weaken because of low calcium intake, which in turn causes teeth to loosen, leaving you at greater risk for gum disease.

The Food and Drug Administration recommends 1,000 mg of calcium daily for women younger than 50 and for men of any age, and 1,200 mg for women over 50. Calcium is found in dairy foods like milk, cheese, and yogurt; in fish, including sardines with bones and salmon; and in some vegetables, including kale and broccoli.

Eating two to four servings of dairy per day will help you meet the RDA for calcium.

Teeth and Vitamin C

The body needs vitamin C to repair connective tissue and help the body fight off infection. No surprise then that a study at the State University of New York at Buffalo showed that those who eat less than the recommended 75 to 90 mg per day are 25 percent more likely to have gingivitis than those who eat three times the recommended daily allowance. Gingivitis is the mildest form of periodontal diseases, and it causes the gums to become red from inflammation, swelling and bleeding easily.

Eating one piece of citrus fruit (oranges, grapefruits, tangerines) or a kiwi daily will help you meet the RDA for vitamin C.

Teeth and Fruits and Vegetables

Crunchy fruit and veggies — like apples, pears, celery, and carrots — are excellent for your teeth in two ways. The crisp texture acts as a detergent on teeth, wiping away bacteria that can cause plaque. Plus these foods require a lot of chewing, which increases the production of bacteria-neutralizing saliva.

Teeth and Tea

While tea may stain teeth, studies at the University of Illinois College of Dentistry have shown that compounds in black tea can destroy or suppress the growth of cavity-causing bacteria in dental plaque, which can help prevent both cavities and gum disease.

Teeth and Water

Drinking plenty of water benefits teeth as it helps rinse away both bacteria and the remnants of food that bacteria turns into plaque. Tap water is better for teeth than bottled because it contains fluoride, which prevents tooth decay.

Foods to Avoid

Sugary snacks, especially gummy candies and hard candies that stick in your teeth, are at the top of every dentist's list of foods to avoid. Regular soda provides a double hit to teeth, combining sugar with acids.

Even foods and drinks that are good for your teeth, like milk, contain sugars. No matter what you eat, it's important to brush and floss afterward — or at least to rinse your mouth with water. Brush twice a day using either a manual or power toothbrush, and remember to visit a dentist at least twice a year for checkups.

Source: http:/www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/tooth-friendly-diet.aspx


Don't forget to floss!

Posted on December 17, 2014 at 12:00 AM


Dentistry Public Health The English do not have worse teeth than Americans, study proves

Posted on

It is a common stereotype, propagated by characters such as Austin Powers: the British man with an abysmal set of chompers. But a new study comparing oral health in the US and England reveals that the oral health of Americans is no better than that of the English.

According to the authors of the study, published in The BMJ's Christmas issue, the popular belief held by Americans that the English have terrible teeth dates back over a century, with toothpaste ads eulogizing American smiles.

 

But until now, there were no studies that directly compared oral health levels and inequalities between England and America.

 

As such, researchers from both the UK and the US used data from the English Adult Dental Health Survey (ADHS) and the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to compare oral health and assess educational levels and income-related oral health inequalities.

 

The study authors note that the UK and US both share similar political systems, but the funding and delivery of health care is quite different.

In the UK, for example, dental care is mostly provided through the National Health Service (NHS), whereas in the US, dental insurance coverage is how care is delivered.

 

Study participants included adults aged 25 years and older. For analysis by education, there were samples of 8,719 English adults and 9,786 American adults. For analysis by income, the sample included 7,184 English participants and 9,094 American adults.

Americans missing more teeth than English participants

 

The researchers looked at outcomes including number of missing teeth, subject self-perception of oral health and oral impacts on daily life - including pain, difficulty eating, avoiding smiling and social effects.

 

Socioeconomic indicators included educational level and household income.

 

Results showed that the average number of missing teeth was higher in the US than in England, at 7.31 vs. 6.97, respectively. However, reporting of oral impacts on daily life was higher in England.

 

The study also showed evidence of oral health socioeconomic inequalities in both countries, but they were higher in the US than in England for all measures.

 

In the US, social inequalities are higher; Americans have different levels of access and treatment services than their British counterparts, and the authors say this fact may have contributed to their findings.

 

They add that "wider societal differences in welfare policies exist, with England having a more comprehensive range of 'safety net' policies, which may help to reduce oral health inequalities."

 

In detail, adults in the lowest socioeconomic position had better oral health in England. Meanwhile, those at the top educational or income levels had better oral health in the US.

Citing sugar consumption and smoking as other possible reasons for their findings, the researchers emphasize differences in welfare policies as the main contributing factor:

 


"In conclusion, we have shown that the oral health of Americans is not better than the English, and there are consistently wider educational and income-related oral health inequalities in the US compared with England."

 

Despite the strength of their large sample size, the study authors point to some limitations. For example, they note that the comparability of subjective measures of oral health serve as a limitation, "as these are sensitive to cultural differences in reporting."

 

Additionally, they note their analysis was limited to just one measure of oral health status - number of missing teeth - so it did not include any aesthetic or orthodontic outcomes, which could be a potential area for future study.

 

Medical News Today recently reported that some sugar-free drinks can also damage teeth. Authors from that study warned that a sugar-free label does not make a product tooth-friendly.

Written by Marie Ellis

 

 

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/304224.php