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Tooth Decay

Posted on July 16, 2015 at 6:05 PM


Asking For A Raise

Posted on June 26, 2015 at 2:45 PM

The seven most dreaded words a dentist hears from his assistant during the workday are, "May I speak with you after work"? Does this mean she's quitting, needs maternity leave, or wants a raise? Whatever the situation, the doctor only hopes it can be handled well.

For the employee who feels the need to ask for a raise, it often takes days or weeks to muster up the courage to ask! With the slow economy of the past few years, raises have been far and few between. Some dental employees have not had a raise in two or three years, yet they feel they’re working harder than ever to maintain the practice goals. They tell me that they often go above and beyond the call of duty to keep the schedule full and to work through emergencies. The work is much harder now than when the practice was fruitful and everyone was happy.

The best way to ask for a raise is to keep a record of the date of the last pay increase, along with the history of what all you have personally done for the practice, patients, and coworkers since your last raise. What CE or online courses have you taken? What above-the-call-of-duty projects have you performed recently? Examples might include volunteering for community activities or services that promote the practice, working on the marketing committee that met during lunch the past six months, developing an in-school program for elementary schools, and participating in the reactivation process of inactive patients. I personally called 45 patients and rescheduled 17 of them, as well as got four new patients in the practice by asking their family members who are patients who in their family needed a new dentist.

In defense of dentists, they are busy caring for patients and running a business, so they are often not in tune with when someone's last pay raise was or what each employee has done for the practice. Don't go to the doctor with an "I need a raise because I DESERVE it attitude." Go with an attitude of gratitude and show your personal value to the practice. Dentists are human. They like the fact that you come to them with a spirit of "Here's how hard I've been working; can we discuss it please?" Does this guarantee a raise? No, but it greatly increases your chances of being considered. It also lets your employer know that you are assertive and you value yourself.


Author bio

Linda Miles, CSP, CMC, is the founder of Miles & Associates and The Speaking Consulting Network in Virginia Beach, Va

The Tooth Friendly Diet

Posted on June 3, 2015 at 4:30 PM

Try these foods to help build strong teeth and healthy gums

What you eat affects your mouth not only by building healthier teeth and gums, but also by helping prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Learn how to eat the best diet for your teeth, including the foods to eat, beverages to drink, and what to avoid.

What you eat affects your mouth not only by building healthier teeth and gums, but also by helping prevent tooth decay and gum disease. While a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and unsaturated fats will benefit your overall oral health, there are a few standout foods and nutrients that can really boost it.

Teeth and Calcium

Mom said it when you were in grade school, and she was right on this one: Drinking milk builds strong bones and teeth. Calcium is vital in childhood and through your teens, when teeth are formed, but the value of this nutrient doesn't stop once you get your wisdom teeth. A diet with adequate calcium may prevent against tooth decay, says Dr. Leonard Anglis, DDS. When a diet is low in calcium, as a majority of Americans' diets are, the body leeches the mineral from teeth and bones, which can increase your risk of tooth decay and the incidence of cavities. A study that appeared in the Journal of Periodontology found that those who have a calcium intake of less than 500 mg, or about half the recommended dietary allowance, were almost twice as likely to have periodontitis, or gum disease, than those who had the recommended intake.

The jawbone is particularly susceptible to the effects of low calcium. It can weaken because of low calcium intake, which in turn causes teeth to loosen, leaving you at greater risk for gum disease.

The Food and Drug Administration recommends 1,000 mg of calcium daily for women younger than 50 and for men of any age, and 1,200 mg for women over 50. Calcium is found in dairy foods like milk, cheese, and yogurt; in fish, including sardines with bones and salmon; and in some vegetables, including kale and broccoli.

Eating two to four servings of dairy per day will help you meet the RDA for calcium.

Teeth and Vitamin C

The body needs vitamin C to repair connective tissue and help the body fight off infection. No surprise then that a study at the State University of New York at Buffalo showed that those who eat less than the recommended 75 to 90 mg per day are 25 percent more likely to have gingivitis than those who eat three times the recommended daily allowance. Gingivitis is the mildest form of periodontal diseases, and it causes the gums to become red from inflammation, swelling and bleeding easily.

Eating one piece of citrus fruit (oranges, grapefruits, tangerines) or a kiwi daily will help you meet the RDA for vitamin C.

Teeth and Fruits and Vegetables

Crunchy fruit and veggies — like apples, pears, celery, and carrots — are excellent for your teeth in two ways. The crisp texture acts as a detergent on teeth, wiping away bacteria that can cause plaque. Plus these foods require a lot of chewing, which increases the production of bacteria-neutralizing saliva.

Teeth and Tea

While tea may stain teeth, studies at the University of Illinois College of Dentistry have shown that compounds in black tea can destroy or suppress the growth of cavity-causing bacteria in dental plaque, which can help prevent both cavities and gum disease.

Teeth and Water

Drinking plenty of water benefits teeth as it helps rinse away both bacteria and the remnants of food that bacteria turns into plaque. Tap water is better for teeth than bottled because it contains fluoride, which prevents tooth decay.

Foods to Avoid

Sugary snacks, especially gummy candies and hard candies that stick in your teeth, are at the top of every dentist's list of foods to avoid. Regular soda provides a double hit to teeth, combining sugar with acids.

Even foods and drinks that are good for your teeth, like milk, contain sugars. No matter what you eat, it's important to brush and floss afterward — or at least to rinse your mouth with water. Brush twice a day using either a manual or power toothbrush, and remember to visit a dentist at least twice a year for checkups.

Source: http:/www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/tooth-friendly-diet.aspx


April 2015 Class!

Posted on May 8, 2015 at 4:30 PM

Graduation Day

Posted on April 11, 2015 at 4:00 PM

HAPPY GRADUATION DAY TO THIS ASWESOME BUNCH!!


Kansas waiter gets new teeth

Posted on March 16, 2015 at 5:10 PM

 

It was a tip that changed a waiter's life, by giving him a new smile.

 

Brian Maixner, of Wichita, Kan., said his life has been brightened thanks to a generous patron who, after meeting him just once, forked over an estimated $25,000 for a much-needed set of dentures.

 

"It's so great. It's a huge weight off of my shoulders," Maixner told the Daily News. "I just have this new appreciation for my health."

 

Maixner's employer, the Doo-Dah Diner,posted a heartwarming picturethat juxtaposed Maixner's new pearly whites with his previous smile, which was sullied by tooth decay.

 

The customer, Fred Boettcher, saw Maixner's embarrassing condition while eating at the diner in January and offered to help on the spot.

 

"He had a lot of dental issues as a kid and he told me 'I can do this and I should do it,'" Maixner recalled, adding that the man also said his Christian faith was the root of his charity. "That's the way he looks at it."

 

Maixner, a 43-year-old single father, said his family couldn't afford dental treatment when he was young and his teeth really began to deteriorate over the last half-dozen years. They made him self-conscious about his appearance, though he said it never affected his work. He has worked as a food server for 20 years.

 

Timrie Shibley, who owns the diner, said Maixner has always managed to please patrons with his gregarious personality. She and her husband, Patrick, hired Maixner in November of 2013 after they saw what a good job he was doing at the restaurant where he worked previously.

 

"The first thing we thought was, 'What an outstanding server,'" Shibley told The News. "Yes, his teeth were offensive, but the second time you meet him you don't think about his teeth. He smiles so big with eyes. He makes such a big impression."

Shibley said she has never gotten a customer complaint about the affable Maixner, though she confessed to worrying whether someone would bring up the appearance of his teeth. That was her initial thought a few months back, when Boettcher approached her to ask about helping Maixner.

 

"He just said, 'I know this sounds crazy, but I want to help him,'" she said. "He said he had done this for nine or 10 other people, and has lived a blessed life and wanted to help."

 

Shibley was overcome with emotion, and when she told Maixner the news she said the two hugged and cried.

 

Maixner received a set of dentures on March 2 and will be fitted for permanent implants at the end of the year. For a man who had never had dental work done, it required an adjustment. Maixner said he is learning how to speak and feel comfortable with his new teeth.

 

When he first went back to work with his new smile, last Wednesday, regular customers were quick to notice.

 

"They all said 'Wow!'" Maixner said. "Me too. I'm still looking at the mirror!"

Shibley said she has never gotten a customer complaint about the affable Maixner, though she confessed to worrying whether someone would bring up the appearance of his teeth. That was her initial thought a few months back, when Boettcher approached her to ask about helping Maixner.

 

"He just said, 'I know this sounds crazy, but I want to help him,'" she said. "He said he had done this for nine or 10 other people, and has lived a blessed life and wanted to help."

 

Shibley was overcome with emotion, and when she told Maixner the news she said the two hugged and cried.

 

Maixner received a set of dentures on March 2 and will be fitted for permanent implants at the end of the year. For a man who had never had dental work done, it required an adjustment. Maixner said he is learning how to speak and feel comfortable with his new teeth.

 

When he first went back to work with his new smile, last Wednesday, regular customers were quick to notice.

 

"They all said 'Wow!'" Maixner said. "Me too. I'm still looking at the mirror!"

SOURCE: http://m.nydailynews.com/news/national/kansas-waiter-received-new-teeth-tip-customer-article-1.2144474

12 Habits of Highly Productive People

Posted on February 3, 2015 at 6:50 PM

1. They have daily dedicated planning time.

Usually 5-10 minutes in the morning or the evening is set aside to think through that day’s (or the next day’s) tasks and to outline a game plan for getting them accomplished.


2. They take care of quick tasks immediately.

If a task pops into their mind and it requires less than 5 minutes of their time, productive people will attend to it right away, eliminating the need to write it down or try to remember it later.


3. They prioritize their to-do list.

 When the day’s list is too long to realistically complete in 24 hours (which for some of us is a daily occurrence), that list is then rearranged to reflect the absolute essentials.


4. They identify and utilize their productivity window.

No one is at his/her best all day long. People who are on top of things know their most productive times—usually a 2-3 hour window that occurs once or twice a day—and intentionally use that time to tackle the most important tasks or the ones that require the most focus. For me it’s 9-11:30am, so I save my menial responsibilities for the late afternoon, when I tend to drag.


5. They know when (and when not to) multitask.

Multitasking gets a bad rap, but highly productive people understand that sometimes it does work—like when you’re listening to a career-related podcast while wiping down your kitchen counters, or when you’re brainstorming project ideas while going for your morning walk. They also know, however, to differentiate between multitasking and just being distracted. Hopping on Facebook every 10 minutes at work? That’s the latter.


6. They use a planning/scheduling tool that works for their lifestyle.

A diehard pen-and-paper person probably won’t be successful with an app-based system, while a true techie would likely lose that day planner within an hour. Similarly, someone whose schedule is closely tied to other family members’ responsibilities needs a system—be it a giant wall calendar for the kitchen or a family-organizing app like Cozi—that accommodates that lifestyle.


7. They take breaks.

It may sound counterintuitive, but working from sunrise to sunset does not a productive person make. Regular breaks for things like food, water, and movement actually make people more effective and efficient.


8. They’re realistic about how much time things take.

If you underestimate how long it takes to, say, write that report or clean your house, you’re inevitably going to get behind. On the other hand, if you always overestimate how long tasks take, you’ll never be as efficient as you could be. Highly productive people find that sweet spot where they can accurately estimate how much time something will take, taking into account occasional breaks and inevitable interruptions.


9. They have someone hold them accountable.

Highly productive people are open about what they want to accomplish that day, week, month, or year—and then don’t want to disappoint when others follow up.


10. They’re perfectionists, but only when it counts.

If every single task, no matter how small, has to be completed without flaw or error, you will probably never finish anything. Striving for perfection can be a help or a hindrance, depending on the stakes, so save the nit-picky attitude for when they’re especially high. (Cover letter for a job application? Be a perfectionist. Email to your Aunt Suzy? A missed typo is OK.)


11. They delegate the right way.

That is, they delegate a reasonable number of tasks that are appropriate to the skill level of the delegatee, and they always say please and thank you.


12. They appreciate what did get done instead of stressing over what didn’t.

Like most things in life, being productive requires a good attitude. At the end of the day, looking at the bright side and choosing to see the accomplishments rather than the missteps means that you’ll feel better, sleep better, and be better prepared to be productive again tomorrow.


Source: http://pickanytwo.net/habits-of-highly-productive-people/#_a5y_p=2467463

 

 


Graduation Day Fall 2014

Posted on December 28, 2014 at 1:50 AM

Congratulations to our AWESOME Fall class, they all graduated December 19th!

Don't forget to floss!

Posted on December 17, 2014 at 12:00 AM


CPR Training

Posted on December 15, 2014 at 9:35 PM

CPR Training

This week our students will be learning CPR and First Aid training. This is a necessary skill needed for the dental office environment.  Our students learn from a professional firefighter, and practice with hands-on manequins. 


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